Download Image:
Download Image:
Download Image:
Download Image:
Download Image:
Download Image:
Download Image:
July 16, 2013

New Nike Free Hyperfeel Functions as an Extension of the Foot

The Nike Free Hyperfeel is created to intuitively move with the foot. It is inspired by Nike’s "Nature Amplified" design ethos — an approach focused on the body in motion and fueled by scientific data and athlete insights.

Research insights informed the precise placement of cushioning and outsole traction for a low-profile shoe that provides padding and protection only where necessary. A drop-in Lunarlon insole with flex grooves allows the foot to have direct contact with the Lunarlon cushioning. The waffle outsole is ultra-thin, allowing the foot to get closer to the ground.  

Scientists in the Nike Sport Research Lab carefully studied which areas of the foot come into contact with the ground and absorb pressure, and which areas require traction. They used pressure-mapping technology and high-speed film to analyze the foot in motion.

The result is Nike Free Hyperfeel, a shoe that mimics the intricate workings of the human foot: Lunarlon foam replicates cushioned pads under the foot. The outsole protects like hardened skin on the sole. Dynamic Flywire flexes and contracts, inspired by ligaments.

"Nike Free Hyperfeel has fewer total shoe parts and places the foot directly on top of responsive Lunarlon foam,” says Tony Bignell, VP of Nike Footwear Innovation. “The shoe acts as extension of the foot and delivers a natural motion sensation for the runner.” 

Outsole

Harking back to Nike co-founder and Oregon Track & Field coach Bill Bowerman, the Nike Free Hyperfeel is structured on a waffle outsole that is reengineered with strategically placed pistons, reflecting key pressure points. Highly durable XDR rubber is added in high-wear heel areas. 

Cushioning

Articulated Lunarlon foam mirrors the flexible, knife-cut cushioning used in Nike Free footwear, but here it is the only intermediary layer between foot and outsole — minimal layers for maximum sensation. (An optional sockliner is included for a personalized fit.)

Fit and support

Nike Flyknit in the upper provides a compression fit and support where needed without unnecessary structure or weight. Nike Flywire cables lend additional support to help lock the foot down. The upper’s seamless construction significantly reduces the number of shoe components: A typical Air Pegasus running shoe is made up of 57 components. The Nike Free Hyperfeel has just seven. By knitting a one-piece upper, Nike Flyknit construction reduces Nike's typical upper waste by an average of 90 percent.

The Nike Free Hyperfeel ($175) will be at retail in the U.S., U.K. and Japan beginning Sept. 5. It can be pre-ordered at nike.com/hyperfeel.